Benjamin Grosvenor opens the ‘Live from the Barbican’ spring/summer series



Saturday 10th April saw Benjamin perform at the opening night of ‘Live from the Barbican’, the spring/summer 2021 series. Benjamin’s recital included a performance of Liszt’s Ave Maria which features on his latest album ‘Liszt’, plus works by Chopin, Ginastera and Ravel. The evening was presented by Lucy Parham.




PROGRAMME


Franz Schubert/Franz Liszt - Ave Maria

Frédéric Chopin - Piano Sonata No 3 in B minor

Alberto Ginastera - Three Argentinian Dances

Maurice Ravel - Gaspard de la nuit



REVIEWS


“The sheer naturalness of Grosvenor’s playing gilds the experience of listening to him at every moment. One enjoys it the way one enjoys the sight of a dolphin swimming, or a master of Chinese calligraphy executing a character with three quick but perfect strokes”

Ivan Hewett, The Telegraph


“as the pianist’s hands swept over the keys, it was easy to understand how this young musician has captivated the musical world. His impressive skill, interpretative style and unique tonal sensitivity were on full display in a challenging program of Romantic and 20th-century music … Most impressive was the extraordinary variety of tonal effects, colors, and rhythmic intensity that he drew from the Steinway … A heart-stopping tumble of sounds and finding the intelligence that both guides and motivates: that is the gift of this impeccable artist”

Linda Holt, Bachtrack


“a showcase of hot brilliance … This thoughtful, unshowy pianist has a subtlety, muscle, and an impishness to his performance”

Alexandra Coghlan, I Newspaper


“Black magic and golden-age gorgeousness … The British pianist's recital beautifully evokes romanticism in isolation”

Jessica Duchen, The Arts Desk


“A glorious recital … the glow from Grosvenor's playing was enough to illuminate the hall"

Colin Clarke, Seen and Heard


"His approach to all of the pieces showed a masterly understanding of their construction and their idiom, and while there was plenty of musical gesture, none of it – even the obviously saccharine arrangement of Ave Maria – felt in the slightest overblown; this was all about the composers, not the performer."

Barry Creasy, Music OMH